July262014
2AM
marauders-fanfilm:

It was a long day on set.

marauders-fanfilm:

It was a long day on set.

(via beautiful-sleepies)

2AM
2AM
fuckyeahmixedbeauty:

21. Mostly Haitian/Filipino, some Dutch and French ancestry as well. 

fuckyeahmixedbeauty:

21. Mostly Haitian/Filipino, some Dutch and French ancestry as well. 

1AM
1AM

dollface-galactica:

calleeyuh:

Took my niece and nephew to have their pictures taken in their traditional Ethiopian clothing. Turned out too cute not to share. :)

OMG!

(via ourafrica)

July252014
fuckyeahmixedbeauty:

I’ve been nervous about submitting this but here it is!
I’m Odessa, born and raised in Canada. On my mums side I’m Trinidadian, Indian, and Venezuelan. On my dads side I’m Bajan.
(But I live with my mum and step dad, who’s French and Irish.)
I think for the most part- and not to sound presumptuous or anything- people are a little confused when they see someone of my skin colour dressing the way that I do. I don’t really claim any sort of label as to what my style is, but to me, it’s just clothing that makes me comfortable. I refuse to fall into any negative stereotype that follows my background, my music, or the way I dress.
Unfortunately, there actually are some people see the way that I dress as "not right", due to my skin colour. It’s been mentioned to me/joked about by some members of my family, kids at school, and a couple of times, random strangers who all seem to have the general idea that "only white people dress like that/listen to that music" or that "I’m not/ I don’t act ‘black’ enough".
No certain type of style or genre of music belongs to only one race, and seeing as I am not one race, I see my style as fitting. Just like my background, my clothing, my style, my hair, and music taste is an immense mishmash of all sorts of counter-cultures and sub-genres as you can clearly see. And I embrace most of my heritage through what my mum and my dads side of the family teaches me(/cooks for me(Bajan and Indian food is so amazing)).
There’s really no way to be "enough" of your heritage by trying to dress or act in a way that people of your race might. I think so long as you embrace and acknowledge where you come from through any shape, way, or form, you don’t have to prove that you’re enough to fucking anybody :)

fuckyeahmixedbeauty:

I’ve been nervous about submitting this but here it is!

I’m Odessa, born and raised in Canada. On my mums side I’m Trinidadian, Indian, and Venezuelan. On my dads side I’m Bajan.

(But I live with my mum and step dad, who’s French and Irish.)

I think for the most part- and not to sound presumptuous or anything- people are a little confused when they see someone of my skin colour dressing the way that I do. I don’t really claim any sort of label as to what my style is, but to me, it’s just clothing that makes me comfortable. I refuse to fall into any negative stereotype that follows my background, my music, or the way I dress.

Unfortunately, there actually are some people see the way that I dress as "not right", due to my skin colour. It’s been mentioned to me/joked about by some members of my family, kids at school, and a couple of times, random strangers who all seem to have the general idea that "only white people dress like that/listen to that music" or that "I’m not/ I don’t act ‘black’ enough".

No certain type of style or genre of music belongs to only one race, and seeing as I am not one race, I see my style as fitting. Just like my background, my clothing, my style, my hair, and music taste is an immense mishmash of all sorts of counter-cultures and sub-genres as you can clearly see. And I embrace most of my heritage through what my mum and my dads side of the family teaches me(/cooks for me(Bajan and Indian food is so amazing)).

There’s really no way to be "enough" of your heritage by trying to dress or act in a way that people of your race might. I think so long as you embrace and acknowledge where you come from through any shape, way, or form, you don’t have to prove that you’re enough to fucking anybody :)

July92014

hammpix:

Folks welcomed the hand reference I posted, so here’s some foot reference.

As an artist you’ll draw A LOT of feet, especially feet that REST ON THE GROUND. Don’t be one of those artists who hides feet behind grass or mist all the time. Print these out and draw ‘em.

I included the knees because you’ll need to know how feet connect with legs; draw ‘em up to the knee.

(via simonist)

1AM
dynamicafrica:

Tesfay Atchbekha Negga was born in Ethiopia in 1970. In 1997, he graduated from I. E. Repin’s Institute for Painting, Sculpture and Architecture at the Russian Academy of Arts.
Throughout the late 90s, many of his works were featured at expositions throughout Russia and Europe.  
(see more)

dynamicafrica:

Tesfay Atchbekha Negga was born in Ethiopia in 1970. In 1997, he graduated from I. E. Repin’s Institute for Painting, Sculpture and Architecture at the Russian Academy of Arts.

Throughout the late 90s, many of his works were featured at expositions throughout Russia and Europe.  

(see more)

(Source: asunkee, via ourafrica)

1AM
beautiesofafrique:

youareunik:

Mash’allah
Qu E E n

Ethiopian 

beautiesofafrique:

youareunik:

Mash’allah

Qu E E n

Ethiopian 

(via ourafrica)

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